New content in the German library, "Gottfried August Bürger: Münchhausen"

I have added the following collection to the German content in the library.

Ich habe eine neue Sammlung, Gottfried August Bürger: Münchhausen, erstellt.

Wunderbare Reisen zu Wasser und zu Lande Feldzüge und lustige Abenteuer des Freiherrn von Münchhausen, wie er dieselben bei der Flasche im Zirkel seiner Freunde selbst zu erzählen pflegt.
Wonderful journeys on sea and on land. The campaigns and funny adventures of Baron von Münchausen, as he himself related to his circle of drinking companions.

They are a Librivox production and are read really well. The book is crazily funny. What I mean is that the stories that are told here are what we would call in Australia ‘tall stories’, and these are among the tallest of the tall! I think they are a lot of fun!

This is the first time I have added any lessons, so please be kind to me. If someone else has put them in the library, I am not aware of it. I will remove them if this is so. There are a couple of little errors in the English preamble of the collection. I do not know how to fix them.

I have put in ten chapters so far. Due to the very strange way our internet connections are working here in Ethiopia (where I am living at present), I have not been able to attach the mp3s for chapters 9 and 11 yet. I am working on it and on the five last chapters. Also, the content page says that I have shared only 8 lessons. Please let me know which ones are not shared, as I do not know which ones they are.

I have labelled the lessons Advanced 1 and Advanced 2, but I think they all should be Advanced 2.

Collection

Erstes Kapitel

Zweites Kapitel

Drittes Kapitel

Viertes Kapitel

Fünftes Kapitel

Sechstes Kapitel

Siebentes Kapitel

Achtes Kapitel

Zehntes Kapitel

Zwölftes Kapitel

The links to the chapters don’t work, even if you repair them (these are links to your personal workdesk).

I don’t think that these lessons are very valuable for learners of German. Only if you have an interest in written German of the 18th century they may be an interesting choice to read.

Example:
“Der arme Teufel dauerte mir von ganzer Seele. Ob mir gleich selbst das Herz im Leibe fror, so warf ich dennoch meinen Reisemantel über ihn her.”

Original text => how you would speak today …

der Teufel dauerte mir => ich bedauerte den Teufel
Ob mir gleich selbst => obwohl mir selbst
ich warf den Mantel über ihn her => ich warf ihm den Mantel über
etc.

Nearly every sentence is old style German.
There are abridged versions of this text in current German (for children) available, like the one from Erich Kästner:

I have to agree. These texts are expecially nice for linguist in the scientif meaning of the word ‘linguist’. The stories that are nice and funny, I’ve read them as a child, but the words, grammar and structure are really old fashioned.

As a learner I would not use them because I want to learn the language like it is spoken.
As I tutor I would only recommend them to very advanced students which have a serious interest in linguistics.

Thanks a lot, rae. The links to share are those you find at the end of each lesson, ending in “/buy”.

I wish I had more time to read them. I don’t care if the language is old now. After all, an advanced learner should be able to realize that a 18-century text doesn’t reflect the way people speak and write in the 21st century and thus the language used in this novel is not to imitate, but just to read.

How do I get the proper links that do work?

Thanks for your comments. Have you any suggestions for other material from the public domain that would be more useful.

Of course, if these stories are not useful, people do not have to read them. When I was learning Spanish my teacher encouraged me to read Cervantes and Lazarillo de Tormes. I enjoy these stories and do not think it did me any harm.

As for the Bürger book, I find there are quite a few sentences that are strange by modern standards. this, of course, happens with English also. I am, however, finding these German stories funny. I hope they will not do me too much harm.

As I wrote, “The links to share are those you find at the end of each lesson, ending in “/buy”” (but I suppose you started writing your message before reading my post) :slight_smile:

I also think reading older texts wouldn’t do any harm, if you are aware that the contemporary language has different vocabulary and structures. And it’s true, no one is forced to read them.

The proper links to the Bürger stories are listed below.

Thanks Veral and Michele for your comments. Of course, I liked your contribution particularly, Michele. I am probably not a very good student, as far as being ready to speak easily. I like exploring all sorts of content and finding new words and constructions, just for fun!

I am aware, however, that I need to get plenty of everyday language into my German language storeroom in my memory. Thank your Vera, for making lots of wonderful content available. I will continue to use plenty of it and will write in German again soon.

Again, if anyone can recomend any public domain stories with Librivox recordings available that would be more suitable than the ones I have shared, please let me know!

Collection

Erstes Kapitel

Zweites Kapitel

Drittes Kapitel

Viertes Kapitel

Fünftes Kapitel

Sechstes Kapitel

Siebentes Kapitel

Achtes Kapitel

Zehntes Kapitel

Zwölftes Kapitel

Thanks again, Michele. Sorry there is a gap in the links. I did not put it in, it just appeared by itself. I have seen this before with links shared by others. Please remove it when before you try to open these files.

Rae, don’t worry. If students use the link to the collection they can easily find the lessons. And they can find the next lesson from the link within the lesson.

Rae, long links always appear broken in the forums. You can shorten them st bitly.com, tinyurl.com or tiny.cc.