LingQ Levels B1-B2, I1-I2, A1-A2?

Do the LingQ Levels match up with standard Europe language Levels?
A1 = Beginner 1
A2 = Beginner 2
B1 = Intermediate 1
B2 = Intermediate 2
C1 = Advanced 1
C2 = Advanced 2

It seems like there is a large gap to go from Beginner 2 to Intermediate 1 (1500 to 6000). I would have thought one needs more than 1500 words to be a Beginner 2.

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A related question: If one has a Beginner 2 level does this mean he is “starting” Beginner 2 or has “accomplished/completed” Beginner 2. My guess is “completed” since if one has Advanced 2 at 30,250 words one is complete with Advanced 2. Or maybe one has completed Advanced 1 and is now working on Advanced 2?

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Two things:

  1. In my experience LingQ’s levels correspond pretty well with the minimum vocabulary requirements for the various CEFR levels as far as comprehension is concerned.
  2. Unless you need a specific certificate for academic, or career reasons, the sooner you forget about tracking your progress based on CEFR levels, the better off you’ll be. People like to say they’re at a B1-C1 etc. but those kind of self assessments are totally arbitrary, in my experience. In the real world, either you can have a conversation in a language, or you can’t just yet. Either you can read books and newspapers, understand movies and TV shows, or you can’t just yet. I think you’ll be happier on the long run if your studies are focused on achieving those goals and not whether someone can call you a B1 or not.
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Thanks for the reply.

In my case, I am not really so interested in bragging rights, but trying to understand how my progress fits in with global expectations of language knowledge.

But it is nice to know that LingQ levels correspond somewhat with CEFR levels. Thanks.

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Totally agree, life is better untethered—-if I could only allow myself to run without always tracking my progress …bad habits

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I think I understand this point of view. However, at least for now, I think working towards goals is what is pushing me to spend a lot of time on languages. Without feeling progress I would likely give up - as I have done in the past.

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The levels in LingQ are based on the self-assessed number of words that a person marks as “known.” Generally this applies to what words the person recognizes when reading. Not only does each person have their own criteria for marking a word as “known,” but this does not take into consideration all four skills: reading, writing, listening comprehension and speaking.

In my experience it is extremely common for language learners to have vastly different abilities in these respective skills unless one is at the C1-C2 levels where these skills can be similar but still are not necessarily identical. (Listening comprehension and speaking are typically MUCH harder than reading.)

If you look at the skills required in the CEFR, you will see what is required at each level.
Objectively assess whether you can perform all four skills at a given level.

Also keep in mind that CEFR levels are assessed by an independent tester regarding subject matter that you may not necessarily know ahead of time and with a person whose speech you haven’t heard before. Personally, I think the four skills in each level are more difficult than the corresponding number of LingQ" words known when just “reading.” How much more difficult depends on many factors including how different the target language is from your native language or from other languages you already know well and how much time you have spent writing, speaking, and listening in the target language.

I agree that unless the CEFR is needed for academic or professional reasons (in which case you will take the test), what level you call your knowledge is irrelevant. It’s what you can actually do in the language that counts. If you say you’re at B2 and can’t get past basic information about yourself and/or mangle pronunciation and grammar, then that will be obvious in a conversation.

Finally, the “intermediate” level is a very broad category where a lot of people struggle to identify markers of their progress. There are so many thousands of words yet to learn, so many more complex grammatical patterns that one still cannot use or understand, it can seem daunting. One teacher recommended – especially during this stage – to write down specifically what one learned every day: not necessarily all the words (since LingQ will keep track of that) but perhaps expressions or topics/patterns that you now understand and can use independently. For example, how to say dates, or common expressions regarding time, etc. By identifying what you learned, you won’t feel as if you are floating in an endless sea of vocabulary and grammar. Reminding yourself what you have in fact learned will help you to stay motivated to continue.

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Like others have said there is a lot of variation in peoples abilities in different categories and the way people use Lingq and mark lingqs is different.
My best guess is
A1 = Beginner 1
A2= Intermediate 1 (maybe a bit before)
B1= Intermediate 2
B2=Advanced 1
C1> Advanced 2

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Interesting. Not exactly the same as t_harangi suggested.

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I think it might also depend on someones definition of each level. If you simply go by someones ability to pass the test than it would probably be lower than I suggested. If you go by the proficiency expectations they give for each level for example they will say a student at a B1 level " Can understand the main points of clear standard input on familiar matters regularly encountered in work, school, leisure, etc. Can deal with most situations likely to arise whilst travelling in an area where the language is spoken. " based on that discretion it might even be higher than I suggested in many cases. It is the same for HSK (the Chinese proficiency standard) I am at an HSK 3 level in Chinese (they claim it is equivalent to B1). Based on their description I should be able to easily communicate with native speakers in day to day tasks. The reality is I struggle to have very simple structured dialogues with my language partners.

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Thanks for all your input.

Yes, I understand. I am not really looking for an exact clear cut answer. I think these discussions are more to give me a general idea of how much work I must do to get to various levels of understandings - since I do not know anything but English well enough to have a conversation with anyone. Just trying to gauge where my approximate level is and how far I have to go.

(Chinese is one language I looked at for a while a few decades ago - and will likely return to one day. For now I think I need to concentrate on a single language and get to some comfortable level - like a B2 - before I branch out to other languages - which I hope to do one day.)

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Thanks for the commentary. I don’t intend to take any tests, but just trying to get a feel for how far along I am. I have a little bit of experience with a few languages so I understand what you mean about the 4 skills - and I have always found that I can move along much quicker with reading than any of the others. I think writing comes second to me. Speaking and listening are not so good, especially listening - as I find that some people talk so fast and some slur words more and less pronounced that unless a person speaks a bit slower and clearly I can’t catch much of what is said.

Thanks.

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I agree!

I like the fact that octopusbuddy excluded C2 from the list. C2 is really difficult. It is defined as a “native educated speaker” level, and I can see many less educated native speakers failing it.

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Thats how I look at a C2 level as well. As a native English Speaker, I wonder if I would be able to even pass a C2 English Exam if I didn’t study for it.

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I don’t think C2 means native level. Unless a native speaker is mentally handicapped (or lived an extremely sheltered life) then they will pass a C2 exam.

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