Jane and I "both always" do something?

Jane always goes to the movies on weekends. And I do too.
So I want to use “both” in a sentence, but I’m not sure “both” goes before “always” or “always” goes before “both”.

  1. Jane and I both always go to the movies on weekends.
  2. Jane and I always both go to the movies on weekends.

It’s (usually) #1. I’m not sure whether there is a rule here, but probably best to keep “both” near the things that “both” includes…

#2 makes me think you and Jane do both of two things, but you never say the second thing.

The more I think about it, maybe #2 is ok… maybe it sounds more like you go to the movies together?

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I would put “both” at the beginning, “Both Jane and I always go to the movies on weekends.” But the word “both” is redundant and sounds awkward as you mentioned two people by name. Are you saying you always go to the movies together? That is what is implied and you have to explicitly state otherwise. “Jane and I always go the movies on weekends, but not together.”

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Yes there should probably be some reason why you’re saying “both” at all. Such as if you’re talking to somebody who does not think you both go.

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