Icelandic beginner podcasts

Hello!

I can’t find any specific forum for Icelandic, so I hope it’s okey that I write here.

I’m looking for a beginner podcast for Icelandic, does anyone know of that? I can only find One MInute Icelandic on spotify, but does anyone know if there exists any with longer episodes?

Best regards,
Carl

2 Likes

I don’t know of any. I try to get any material that is in text and speech form into LingQ, but there is both a lack of material overall and a lot of material that I don’t have permission to put into LingQ. Sometimes I have material that is only in text or only in speech form that I have permission to use (or was even made by myself) and then there can be a lot of work involved in creating the missing text or speech. I made a few episodes of what is called “Einfalt eintal” in LingQ, which I suppose you could listen to, but it’s just a few episodes and may be a bit difficult if you are a complete beginner.

4 Likes

Depending on your level, this might help you learn. Simple children’s books that also have audio where someone has read them: Bókaskápur

3 Likes

Thank you! I’m very much in the beginning, but I’m Swedish so when I have text/subtitles I can understand a lot, and a lot of the videos etc on lingq are super good. But for podcast I would need (want) something that’s much slower.
I would like to take the moment to thank you for all the things you’ve added to Lingq, I’ve had much joy from reading Àlagardálurinn and Leiðarvísir í ástamálum!
And thanks for the link to Bókskápur too, I will check it out!

4 Likes

Unfortunately I do not have permission to put the mms.is material into LingQ. I’m working on it but the copyrights/author’s rights are complicated. Hopefully it will work out in the future. Depending on your level of Icelandic, there should be some e-books, audio books and books in both audio and text form, as well as interactive e-books (often with audio) here at this link. Rafbókaskápur | Menntamálastofnun

Again, it’s just too bad I can’t put them into LingQ so people would be able to benefit from the automatic translations and word counts.

Hoppas det går bra med att lära islänska…

3 Likes

Thank you rokkvi for the link to the mmm.is site. There is so much material here! I’m having a great time looking through it all. For much of the material, ebooks, audio books, etc., it is possible to import into LingQ and create private lessons. It will be nice if it ever becomes available for public use.

I understand your frustration with Icelandic podcasts carlinberg. There are a lot of Icelandic language podcasts out there. I like going to RUV for their radio and TV shows. I do it to immerse myself into the language. It also provides me with a goal. I listen and say, Ok, I’m going to be able to understand all of this someday. Don’t give up. But the radio podcasts don’t come with transcripts or audio downloads, as far as I can tell.

3 Likes

I will go to RUV and check too! As for podcasts, are there any that you listen to and/or like?

1 Like

Yes at least dedicated learners can privately import mms.is material into LingQ, including a lot of material that is both in audio and text form. I’d really prefer to be able to make the material shared on LingQ, so it would be easier to notice and people wouldn’t have to figure out themselves how to get the audio and text into LingQ, which can be a bit of work. There is a team at the Ministry of culture in Iceland working on making Icelandic material more open the public. I am not sure where they are at right now, but at a meeting I got to have with the ministry, I suggested making RÚV material with transcripts more available, allowing me to use the audio of hbs.is directly on LingQ instead of having to just link to the audiobook and also whether it would be possible to get mms.is material into LingQ.

4 Likes

Rokkvi, I am really a beginner in Icelandic also. I know I am a glutton for punishment when I don’t even start as a beginner but launch into reading novels right away. I have been reading the novels about Auður by Vilborg Davidsdottir. Since I am somewhat familiar with the history and geography of the Vikings in Ireland, Scotland, and Iceland settlement 1,000 years ago, I basically understand almost all of what is going on. However, I find that the google translations are really strange. I almost feel like there is no good Icelandic to English translations. Translated words (especially compound words) sometimes make no sense. Even translated sentences sometimes make no sense. But I move on anyway since I understand the story anyway. I don’t recall having so many strange translations when I studied other languages - such as Norwegian. I’ve wondered if this is due to fewer Icelandic speakers so google translations have not made a better effort on getting decent translations. I don’t expect this issue to be solved. I was just curious as to your thoughts on this. I still have really enjoyed reading the novels.

1 Like

About the translations and specifically google translations.

Now google does some things well in translating Icelandic. I was surprised to see how it can figure out the genders of adjectives from context in Icelandic, when it does not seem to do that in Russian (I don’t know Russian but asked some friends to verify this). Here is an example, try translating “Eric is fat” and “Erica is fat” to Icelandic and it will know to say “feitur” and “feit” respectively. This should generally work for most names that are predominantly male or female.

But for the most part, I’m sure google, whisper and whichever program you pick puts relatively little effort into small languages like Icelandic. Icelandic is also quite hard to translate because of it’s features/attributes. The compound words can potentially be a problem, depending on how intelligent the translation software is and Icelandic is also full of what you might call idioms…

…Let me get into that a little bit better. A lot of concepts where there could potentially just be a verb to signify them, we have a verb and a preposition, where neither the verb, nor the preposition on it’s own seem to have anything to do with the combined meaning. Let me give you some examples, with the concept in Icelandic, word for word translation and then the actual meaning:

Að halda fram (to hold forth) = to claim
Að halda fram hjá (to hold past) = to commit adultery
Að taka fram (to take forth) = to state
Að bera af (to carry off) = to excel / to be outstanding
Að fara hjá sér (to go by oneself) = to get embarrassed
Að leiða hjá sér (to conduct by oneself) = to ignore
Að fara fram á (to go forth on) = to demand (although “að fara fram á brúnina” could also literally mean “to walk to the edge”)

So you can imagine how you would have to teach a translation engine or AI machine how to translate word combinations like this correctly, especially since some of these can both have the literal meaning of the words combined, or that idiomatic meaning.

3 Likes

Thanks for the reply, Rokkvi. I noticed some of those same idiosyncracies in my reading although I couldn’t always understand exactly what it meant. Nevertheless, I could still follow the story. And I do understand how complicated the Icelandic language is compared to Norwegian. I appreciate all your effort with the work you have done in Lingq with Iclandic. And your willingness to help answer our questions. Kærar þakkir.

2 Likes