Extensive reading in LingQ. Do you look up every word?

Title says it all. I want to move to more extensive reading now that I’m getting better at German. I play around with this outside of LingQ and really like it. I’ve gotten over that problem of wanting to understand every sentence and look up every unknown word but it would be nice to do this using lingq because it would track the words I’ve read, it’s easier to look up phrases and words when I do want to and many other reasons.

The problem is, if you don’t look up a word and create a lingq, it’ll assume you know it and create a very faulty known word count over time. What do people do?

P.S. It would be interesting if there was a toggle whereby you can read through uploaded books but the blue words don’t get added to known words when you change page. They remain blue so that you can skim read things using the site. What are peoples thoughts on this?

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There is an Auto LingQ function which will LingQ all the blues for you as long as you right arrow through them, so that when you go back to intensive reading you can edit the definitions if it picked ones that aren’t helpful for you.

The LingQ score only counts Ks and 4s, so don’t be afraid of making a bunch of LingQs.

Hi I’m in a similar position as you. What I do is do the extensive reading outside of lingq especially for easier stuff like comics, and for harder stuff like novels I read and look up every word in lingq. Because it’s it’s intensive I’ve found myself away from lingq more and more these days reading comics which has been very enjoyable and has really improved my Spanish level. You could also go to your reading setting and disable the turn blue words to known after you turn the page, and then just not hit finish lesson and the words will remain unlinked if that’s what you desire.

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“The problem is, if you don’t look up a word and create a lingq, it’ll assume you know it and create a very faulty known word count over time. What do people do?
P.S. It would be interesting if there was a toggle whereby you can read through uploaded books but the blue words don’t get added to known words when you change page. They remain blue so that you can skim read things using the site. What are peoples thoughts on this?”

Unfortunately, you can’t do this. Yet. I’m waiting for the functionality to turn this off too. You can go into the reader options and turn off ‘paging moves to known’, but there currently is no option to turn off ‘complete lesson moves to known’. So the only way around this is to not click ‘complete lesson’. If more of us ask, hopefully we can get the option for this functionality. Though, you have to request this in one of the forums that are monitored by the LingQ staff (not all forums are monitored, from my understanding).

“it’ll assume you know it”?? Don’t let it turn words white unless you know them

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it would be nice to do this using lingq because it would track the words I’ve read, it’s easier to look up phrases and words when I do want to and many other reasons.

I do it my way but see if it works for you. As an example, I just uploaded a novel.

Steps

  1. I create lingqs of unknown words(blue highlighted words) in each lesson and finish it up. I am not reading at this moment. I am simply creating lingqs. Simply looking up meanings with grading 1.

  2. I do it with all lessons takes me a couple of days (minimum a couple of hours in a day). because I am simply creating lingqs. Remember I am not reading at the moment.

  3. At the end of the reading session in a day once you are done creating lingqs. Go to your reading setting under your profile and manually fix your reading total and set it to 0. It will reduce reading word count. You did not read anything but you simply created lingqs. I use grading 1 for it. I use grading 3 for known word.

  4. Now you are ready for doing extensive reading on LingQ. Start from lesson 1 and now you should start reading extensively. If you come across a word that you want to make known you can use grading 3 for it (whatever grading you need to follow).

In short, as you can see that you need some pre-work to do before you actually sit down and start reading extensively by using LingQ.

At least it works for me.

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Go into the setting and turn off all the “auto” stuff. You don’t have to let it turn blue words to known.

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I use LIngQ for extensive reading in both Russian and German. I let the system assume new words are known unless and until I tell it otherwise. I don’t look up (and therefore create a LingQ for) a word until it has cropped up a couple of times and my ignorance is bothering me, eg it spoils the punchline of a joke. Yes, it means my count of known words gets inflated. But frankly, Russian is such an inflected language, that a word may easily turn up in 20 different forms, each of which LingQ counts as a new word. So I stopped worrying about accuracy of the word counts a long time ago.

Also, once I have created a LingQ, I put no especial effort into learning it. Once it has cropped up about 7 to 10 times in my reading I will probably recognise it, then I move it to known.

This does have an impact on the kind of vocabulary I learn. With detective novels, the word for “arsenic” cropped up a lot early on, whereas the word for “hypoteneuse”, if it crops up at all, is unlikely to feature often enough for me to learn it. As I’m not studying for an exam that is not a problem for me.

AS long as you keep earning coins (and joining a challenge is a great motivator to do that) then I recommend that you trust the system, you are learning.

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Not directly an answer to your question, but I do my extensive reading elsewhere. I use LingQ only for my intensive reading.
My recent habit has been to always be reading at least two ebooks; one intensively, the other(s) extensively.
For the extensive reading, I read on my ereader, sometimes along with the with matching audio (Kindle/Audible “companions”).
Since my Kindle is less responsive and flexible with regard to dictionary and translation lookups, I tend to look up only those words crucial to understanding the “jist” of the story. I let other unknown or half-inferred words go under the proverbial bridge.
Listening while reading provides me with additional hints towards comprehension and meanings. Vocal inflections will often signal words of higher or lower significance, or that a phrase is more idiomatic than literal.
This tends to make it more comfortable to proceed with a higher level of unknown/ assumed from context meanings.

Some people seem to be hesitant to move words to the “known” category; I doubt that I can convince anybody to adopt a more pragmatic approach, but still, I’d like to make a few points:
1 LingQ is a tool to learn languages: the point is to learn a language, not to create perfectly accurate statistics
2 The statistics are subjective: when is a words known, should names to be ignored? different people will come to different conclusions
3 Tolerating ambiguity: I think it can be helpful to resist the temptation of looking up everything - save that time, and rather get more input

Personally I have started to only look up “interesting” words and have LingQ move everything else to “known”. If in doubt, I can always look a word up, regardless of its color. I have to say I enjoy reading in this way, especially on mobile devices, for example tapping a word just to ignore it is distracting and kills the immersion (imho). I’m doing this for Dutch and Romanian at the moment, however, this method doesn’t really work for very difficult languages. In my case that would be Chinese, I still need to look up a lot, otherwise my comprehension falls too far.
But I do think even in this case, a pragmatic attitude can save a lot of time. For example, some time ago we had a discussion here concerning what should be considered a “word” in Chinese; my conclusion is that I don’t want to worry about this at all and just go with the flow.
So, if LingQ considers something a word, I don’t question the system, for me the only relevant question is “do I know what this ‘item’ means?” - if yes → move to known, else → LinQ.

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I think this is the right attitude. If I recognize a word and produce one of the meanings without looking it up I mark it as known. Even if I had to think a bit I’ll still mark it as known. Sometimes or even often I come across the same word again and I won’t know what it means in that context and I usually just keep it as known because it’ll eventually get figured out.

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