They never trust you if they poach you

If I say: “They’LL never trust you if they poach you”, does it make a difference? Or both are okay?

Thank you!!

both ok.

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The Good Wife, Season 3, Episode 15, Live from Damascus
25:10

Alicia: Caitlin, has Viola asked you to join her firm?
Caitlin: Yes. I said no.
Alicia: Yes. Just so you know, other firms will try to distract you by asking you to join them. It means nothing. They never trust you if they poach you. It’s best to stay loyal.

Poaching literally means the illegal hunting (or capture) of wild animals, namely for “harvesting” valuable animal parts. For example, killing elephants for their large tusks to obtain valuable ivory.

Obviously, poaching is used figuratively here to mean stealing someone from another company (or in this case, law firm) by hiring them away from the other company. “Harvesting” them, if you will.

Alicia is saying that once the competing law firm succeeds in stealing you away from the other firm, they never trust you after that.

There really is no difference in meaning. The difference is very subtle and chiefly a matter of grammar.

They never trust you if they poach you. = Once they succeed in stealing you away from the competition, they never trust you after that.

They’ll never trust you if they poach you. = They will never trust you if they succeed in stealing you away.

p.s. I doubt you would ever need to say (or hear anyone say) “if they poach you” in real life. But then there’s this:
https://forums.whirlpool.net.au/archive/2172367