Steve, Friedemann is challenging me

I don’t think anyone has debated homosexuality so far… are you?

I think we are discussing word usage. I think klc doesn’t have a lot of experience with hearing this word used outside of literature and the gay community.

I am not sure that is the case. I think it was quite clear in what context Chris used the word. I take Chris at his word that he is not prejudiced against gays or anyone else, but that does not mean that he cannot make jokes about gays, or Frenchmen, or Germans, or lawyers or any particular group.

There is a history of considerable discrimination against gays, but censoring people’s speech is not going to change that. So while I respect klc’s perspective, I think it is healthier if we are not always looking for implied offense in jokes. It is in the essence of a joke that someone is made fun of, fairly or otherwise, and it is not really that big a deal. Genuine discrimination or persecution is, and we should not lump the two together.

On the other hand, I would hope that there are no derogatory comments about Canadians here, that would be in bad taste, and I would have to jump and moderate any such comments.

If you overheard someone say, “That judge has a queer notion of justice,” how would you translate into French? In this case, the word “queer” doesn’t necessarily have anything to do with homosexuality.

I don’t know how widely spread this usage is, but I would not be surprised to hear “queer” in the sense of “unconventional” used by people in parts of New England.

@Keith,

I didn’t see any evidence that Friedemann had wild and crazy ideas about language learning. He seems to be a fairly successful language learner with European language.
Friedemann is just frank, and he likes to discuss ideas. Just my opinion. If I weren’t a married girl, I would skype him and discuss Chinese with him.

If Friedemann is ahead of you in Chinese, I would listen to his advice, but of course, Steve is the best resource here other than native speakers, for Mandarin, but d

On the other hand, I would hope that there are no derogatory comments about Canadians here, that would be in bad taste, and I would have to jump and moderate any such comments.

That’s asking too much, Steve. If I can’t joke about Canadians, then is life worth living?

I am glad you see it my way, not.

Unfortunately, this forum is too addicting, Steve. I’m not working on my languages enough and it shows. I wish you continued success with LingQ. Maybe if I just read the forum instead of write here, I’ll actually show some progress next month!

Unfortunately, this forum is too addicting, Steve. I’m not working on my languages enough and it shows. I wish you continued success with LingQ. Maybe if I just read the forum instead of writing here, I’ll actually show some progress next month!

I am a Canadian and I live in Henderson which is a suburb of Las Vegas (I can see both the Eiffel Tower and the pyramid from my house) and I think Chris is very funny, even though he has failed to take me up on my coffee in Vegas challenge! Should I through down the proverbial glove? Chris, I think my Henderson coffee can beat your Las Vegas coffee! So whadda ya say?

”If I weren’t a married girl, I would skype him and discuss Chinese with him." ??

What happened to ‘not’?

I think she will be back, she always come back.

is ‘not’ the same as ‘maitee’ etc…?

I think so, …but it remains a mystery, but a pleasant one…let’s wait and see,

In our little corner of England we still use “I’m feeling quite queer”, “You have a queer look on your face, what’s up?” and other quaint little expressions. I don’t see anything queer in using queer in both meanings. As to the sometimes queer, but always endearing behaviour of some on-off members, I am pleased to read their comments, in whatever guise they are writing.

And as a matter of fact, the Neo-Pagan community IS represented on LingQ. Let’s have no witch-hunting here please.

Mind you, I never met a Pagan who found the word “weird” offensive. It means (quick lookup on Wiktionary):

  1. Having supernatural or preternatural power.
  2. Having an unusually strange character or behaviour.
  3. Deviating from the normal; bizarre.
  4. (archaic) Of or pertaining to the Fates.

Can I be there AND be weird?

My wife’s family uses the word “queer” a great deal. When I first met my wife it was all a bit, well queer to be honest as I’d never really encountered the word used in its original meaning before. Sometimes the word accidentally slips out when I’m at work resulting in some quizzical looks.

It’s almost like I’d LingQ’d it and reviewed it in several hundred different contexts, mostly related to the “odd”, “bizarre” meaning of the word, so it has now become part of my active vocabulary… although I didn’t use flashcards.

“I think klc doesn’t have a lot of experience with hearing this word used outside of literature and the gay community.”

Were this the case, I doubt I’d care so much about queer and its usage. I’m not expecting everyone to agree with my perspective, but there’s certainly a reason I have it.

I did fail to take national/generational variation into account, though, and I have heard British friends and people my grandparents’ age use queer to mean peculiar. In terms of the US, though, I think things are so politicized these days that you can’t actually use the word in this country without acknowledging the reference to gay people - someone in your audience is bound to read in the link even if you don’t intend it, which I think we’ve shown here. In my corner of the world (which is actually in the American South, so maybe not and I should go discuss this over coffee) queer-as-peculiar-and-only-peculiar doesn’t really happen with the under 50 crowd - the word carries too much baggage, too many implications. It’ll be interesting to see whether the original usage dies out entirely here in a few decades.

Anyway, what happened to Keith? I feel like we’ve completely hijacked his thread…

I have had a very gay time reading this thread.

If you haven’t seen this already, here’s the challenge (+20 minutes):