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I read faster than people speak. I don’t know if that is the norm or not. It probably is.I suppose that it the At LingQ I’ve found myself reading the article through while the speaker is still far behind. I have to really slow down if I want to listen. In essence, I’ve become more impatient. I don’t know what I would do with speed reading. I wish more people would provide content at normal speed like Alsuvi.

Errata: I read faster than people speak. I don’t know if that is the norm or not. It probably is. At LingQ I’ve found myself reading the article through while the speaker is still far behind. I have to really slow down if I want to listen. In essence, I’ve become more impatient recently. I don’t know what I would do with speed reading. I wish more people would provide content at normal speed like Alsuvi.

In my experience in English, normal conversation on our site is recorded at a speed of around 180 to 200 words a minute. Someone reading an article is closer to 125-150 words per minute. A good reader can read at 300 to 500 words per minute in their own language, usually more slowly in the language they are learning.

Most of my own listening is done away from the computer, on my iPod. I only occasionally listen while reading, usually while creating LingQs. This is only possible once your percentage of new words is down to a comfortable level.

RQ, if you look around I am sure you will find a variety of content at different speeds. If you change your Level to Intermediate 2 or Advanced the My Level shelf in the Library will suggest content that is more challenging.

If you have an iPod you can listen to the podcasts 2x faster

@ RQ

A great way to take advantage of slower-spoken content and still challenge your brain (and mouth) is to use a technique called ‘shadowing’ (you can search this term on Google), where you listen to the content (without reading) and repeat it aloud immediately after you hear it, that is, you’re continuously listening and repeating a second behind for the duration of the piece of content.

I translated a text on the subject by a speech trainer named Matthias Poehm (though he calls shadowing 'The Simulateneous Technique) which essentially describes the technique. You can read it here

I’ve just recently started to use this technique for German and Spanish (admittedly, I have an advanced level in both of these languages) and I have found it particularly effective, where I initially doubted how effective it was claimed to be. As Matthias Poehm essentially says in the article, by the time you’re finished shadowing you have the feeling that you’ve had a long conversation in the language, and it’s a great way to train yourself to speak faster and to improve your concentration, as well as helping you to better remember new words/words you don’t yet use actively.

*Caution: it takes a little while to get used to using this technique at the beginning, so don’t think that just because you can’t do it right away you will never be able to do it. I had a lot of difficulty and negative/self-doubting thoughts when I first tried it out for German, but after about 20 minutes I got over them. A good way to start out is to try it in your native language before trying it in your foreign language.

David, I’ve actually been shadowing in other languages (mostly Greek and German) for awhile. I think it’s a good technique-especially to get a better sense of how the language flows. I find if I can get the rhythm and stress down, the longer words become much easier to say. I’ll look at your links if the internet provider will cooperate. I appreciate the fact that you consistently offer interesting ideas here for discussion.

I read way faster than I speak, two pages per minute (Swedish/English), up to three pages per minute if it’s an “easy” text. At least one page per minute in German and Spanish, slightly slower for French and Russian. I have watched TV and movies with subtitles since I was four (1977).

Thank you David for your translation of Matthias Pöhm’s text. It was interesting for me because I used his CDs four years ago as I had to improve my German. I’m sure, his technique helped me a lot.

BTW, is it you reading out loud?

I need to improve my reading skills because I don’t read very fast, even in English. However, I’ve always found that I can take a lot more in in a shorter period of time when listening. I particularly enjoy listening to people speaking quickly. It could be my because of my attention span, but when I hear people speaking really slowly I find it hard to follow what they are actually saying.

Yes Juergen, that’s me reading the translation of Matthias Pöhm’s text:)

@peter

I know what you mean about having difficulty following what people speaking slowly are saying. It’s not your attention span, it’s the fact that your brain is BORED. For the same reason your thoughts start to wander when you read too slowly and skip back a lot (which many people do), which is why, when that happens, you should read FASTER to get your brain back in gear. Check out this title for more on the subject

http://englishtips.org/index.php?newsid=1150800315

Thanks for the tip David :slight_smile: