Less use of English in the EU post Brexit?

This Junker guy seems to me to be (I grope for a mild term) a “well-watered buffoon”. Yet he may actually have an excellent point about the use of English declining within the EU after Brexit. This is something I myself have long predicted, in fact.

I see it as a hugely positive cultural development. Up to now the institutions of the EU (and some of the individual member states) were in the grip of a kind of “English creep”. Possibly there were some people who had the ultimate goal of switching business, academia and government in the whole of Europe over to English - with local languages being relegated to the status of kitchen table dialects, more or less.

Politically that becomes…ahem…rather more difficult now! :slight_smile:

Obviously English remains a major world language, and its use within the EU isn’t going to disappear overnight (any more than French disappeared overnight after we were tricked into EEC membership by Edward Heath back in the 70s) But it is surely almost inevitable that French, German, Spanish, etc will become stronger in the longer term?

A strengthening of the linguistic diversity of Europe and the increased official use of French (and other languages) can only be a good thing, can it not?

And hey, young people in Britain may actually - shock horror - have a reason to invest the time and effort to learn a European language in the future? Over the last few decades you only did languages at a British university if you were a pretty rare bird or someone who wanted to make a point of being an Über-student, so to speak…

Happy language days ahead! :smiley:

Oh please, it’s not like your country is moving anywhere. And the UK is hardly the only reason why people learn English anymore. English will keep on getting more popular because of the Internet, video games, tv shows, desire to travel, etc.

Do you think that EU schools will completely revamp their language education towards German or French? That would be a hard sell.

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“Happy language days ahead! :-D”

Can’t you see Prinz_Brexiteer is suffering?

Let him be!

It’s taking him time to adjust!

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“…Do you think that EU schools will completely revamp their language education towards German or French?..”

The UK aside, there are already quite a few school pupils in many other parts of the EU who learn German as well as English.

Do I think English will be solemnly declared an “un-language” after Brexit, and formally expunged from the curriculum in all schools by EU diktat?

Obviously not (although I personally would be happy enough if it were - for the reasons outlined in my OP) English nevertheless remains the main international lingua franca right now, and people in the EU will still be highly motivated to learn it.

Do I think that, in the longer term future, people like diplomats and EU officials within the actual apparatus of the monster in Brussels will be using French (and German) rather more than they do now?

Well, yeah. How it can be otherwise after we have left??

In a way it would be a continual humiliation for these stuffed grey suits to go on using English for 99% of their meetings, etc - perhaps a bit like playing the record collection of your ex-spouse every single day, even after being brutally dumped by that person! :smiley:

“…Can’t you see Prinz_Brexiteer is suffering?..”

You’re right. There is always that lurking fear at elections - what if the opinion polls are wrong!? :-0

But then, what if they are RIGHT? In that case Labour is about to take a truly brutal and savage electoral beating - one which would put them out of contention for power for the next 10 or 15 years!

I would love it if that does happen!

I would just freaking well LOVE it!

:smiley:

Fair enough! I agree that diplomats are more likely to learn German and French now. I thought you meant average folks living in the EU.

“the use of English declining within the EU after Brexit”

Why? I don’t think the UK’s membership of the EU has anything to do with people using English.

“A strengthening of the linguistic diversity of Europe and the increased official use of French (and other languages) can only be a good thing, can it not?”

I think it’s neither here nor there, if that means anything…

“The UK aside, there are already quite a few school pupils in many other parts of the EU who learn German as well as English.”

I have met many people who have learned other foreign languages in addition to English at school. Usually they speak English fluently and can just about say one or two basic greetings in the other language.

Well, that wasn’t my experience. During my time as a student in Germany I came across numerous folks from countries like France, Poland, The Czech Republic and Sweden (to give some that still come to mind) who were highly fluent in German. And I met people from outside Europe too, who were very competent speakers of German - people from Turkey, from various Arab nations, and a girl from Japan (she was a really sweet BTW!)

There was even one American! (Sorry Donald, but it’s true…)

“…Why? I don’t think the UK’s membership of the EU has anything to do with people using English…”

Tell Junker folks! He’s the one who made the assertion…

Junker doesn’t decide much. Merkel saying it would hold some more weight to me.

Right now it is Junker who is the ultimate symbolic enemy for the British Right :slight_smile:

You gotta give the EU one thing: they are very good at serving up pantomime villains for us. Junker and the other dude (what’s his name? Guido Verhof-something-or-other) even LOOK like nutty villains from a Batman film! :smiley:

Maybe a bigger language like German or French, but I don’t see any increasing use of smaller languages like Dutch.

Well, the official working languages of the EU are English, French and German (I think??)

So yeah, minus English those two would still be left, I guess…

Maybe time to give Esperanto a chance

It isn’t the citizens’ fault if governments don’t emphasize the issue of learning second or third languages. English, being a major lingua franca, as well as a very popular language globally, is probably going to remain just as prominent. Or, it may continue its ascendance.