Is this for time travelers?

Is this for time travelers?

“De numero praesentium dissensio
Praesidens Trump censet inter inaugurationem suam apud Capitolium quindecies centena milia hominum adfuisse. Photographemata autem ex aere facta ostendunt multitudinem fuisse aliquot centenorum milium, quod est tertia fere pars ex eis, qui anno bis millesimo nono (2009) inaugurationem praesidentis Obamae spectaverunt.”

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I happened to buy two books on Latin recently. But I don’t know if I should learn the language.
I think that the pronunciation of the language is not as complicated as that of English.

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Using click bait titles on LingQ now, I like it. But as for Latin, I’m not real sure the use to learn it other than to read historical documents, and perhaps bridge connections between Latin and modern romance languages. I think it is a cool language, but not worth my time personally.

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I’m not sure either whether to try Latin. It’s not a useful language in the modern world but if you find old literature that you want to read then there’s nothing like reading it in the original.

The pronounciation of ancient languages must be very regular (if not necessarily uncomplicated) thanks to the fact that no audio recordings exist from that time. I suppose you just have no way of knowing about pronounciation irregularities. There are many ways to pronounce Biblical Hebrew but whichever set of rules you learn you end up sticking to them consistently.

Benedict 16 said to reporters that he was retiring in Latin and only one reporter understood what he said! So I guess it can be useful.

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Out of hundreds of reporters?

No, I think there were only a few.

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“In a heated debate with her editor, the journalist insisted her Latin knowledge was sound and they could run with the story.”

That’s pretty brave.

Yeah well imagine you’re her editor: “He’s retiring, it never happened ever and I’m the only one that heard this”…must’ve sounded crazy

Obviously I agree that learning Latin is not as useful as learning “living languages”. I have dabbled a tiny bit in Latin and I’m interested in it for three reasons, two of which you mentioned (historical documents and bridge to Romance languages). The third is simply that it was the language of the Romans, and as an amateur Roman historian, I dig that aspect of Latin. But I don’t imagine I’ll ever spend hours a day on it.